Male fertility: Sperm count has halved in the past 45 years
Sciences male fertility

Your sperm count has halved in the past 45 years

Human sperm

The study confirms previous findings about low sperm counts in men

Cowell: AFP/YUICHI YAMAZAKI

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Today, male semen contains half as many sperm as it did in the 1970s, and the trend is declining. So a recent study from Israel is sounding the alarm.

DrAccording to a new study, men’s sperm counts worldwide are declining at a faster rate than ever before. Between 1973 and 2018, the average sperm concentration decreased by more than 51 percent – from 101.2 million to 49 million sperm per milliliter of semen.

The data also indicated that “this global decline is accelerating in the 21st century,” according to the study, published Tuesday in the journal Human Reproduction Update.

According to researchers led by Israeli epidemiologist Hagai Levin, sperm counts are currently declining at a rate of 1.1 percent per year. The reasons for this are not clear. Therefore, more research and measures are urgently needed to prevent further deterioration of male fertility.

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For the meta-analysis, the researchers evaluated data on more than 57,000 men from 223 studies in 53 countries. It essentially confirmed the findings of a 2017 study, which had been criticized for including only data from North America, Europe, and Australia and New Zealand.

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