Aline Rotter-Focken The German Wrestling Association (DRB) has delivered a historic victory. The former world champion defeated five-time world champion Adeline Grave of the United States in the final of Tokyo 7: 3. It was the first Olympic medal for a German female wrestler – and then instantly gold.

For the 30-year-old it was a special fight in every way.

Not only did he go as a foreigner to the finals in the weight category up to 76 kg, but also his last chance for Olympic gold. Rotor-Foken had previously said that these games would be the end of their lives.

After the fight the wrestler said, “I have been drawing from this moment for many years.” I have been joking for years and I will save this for the perfect ending. Must come. “

Against him and his close friend Grave, Rotor-Foken was last knocked out in the 2019 World Cup. He entered the final to get a chance for revenge by defeating Belarus’ Vasilissa Marcelju, Chinese Qian Zhao and Asian champion Hiro Minakawa of Japan.

Rotor-Phoen took advantage of this and showed an amazing performance towards the end of his career.

Change in German wrestling

In addition to gold, Rotor-Phoen won three World Cup medals in 2014: silver in 2017, bronze in 2015 and 2019. National coach Patrick Lois said, “Of course we will lose Ally – the draft horse, the training partner and the team. But it will not disappear completely.”

They want to try to integrate athletics with structures in the future. “She did a lot for our game and will continue to do so,” said sports director Janice Jamanturitis.

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Until now, only male wrestlers in Germany have won Olympic gold. Mike Pullman, who won Barcelona in 1992, is the last Olympic champion from the DRP rankings. Alexander LeBold won 2000 gold in Sydney. After a controversial doping procedure, he won the competition legally, but for legal reasons he was not allowed to call himself an Olympic champion.

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