Reykjavik. The quake struck near Basel, about 50 kilometers southwest of the German-Swiss border, on Saturday night. The quake, measuring 4.1 on the Richter scale, struck just before 1am, according to the ETH University Earthquake Service in Zurich. The epicenter was reported below the Pacific Ocean floor, however; no tsunami alert was issued.

“Widely felt”, it said in ETH. The police received some calls about 100 kilometers away from the concerned citizens who felt the quake. Damage was not initially reported. According to officials, the quake strikes Switzerland on average once a year.

High earthquake in Iceland

Just a few days ago a month-long volcanic eruption was announced in southwestern Iceland – the earth beneath that region was not yet calm. The North Atlantic Meteorological Agency has recorded thousands of earthquakes over the past few days in the volcanic region of the Reykjavk Peninsula southwest of Reykjavik, many of which were on Christmas Eve and Saturday night with a magnitude of 4.0.

According to Icelandic broadcaster RÚV, satellite data indicate that magma streams are moving underground and trying to reach the surface – which is what causes earthquakes. These occur in waves, just like before a volcano erupts in the spring. However, it is not yet clear if all of this will lead to another eruption.

The volcanic eruption on the peninsula began in mid-March. Since then, the volcano has erupted from the underground volcanic system of Krisvik and erupted from the earth. Although the area is about 30 kilometers from the Icelandic capital Reykjavik, there is no danger to people or the surrounding area. On the contrary, the scene has become a magnet for volcanic explorers, mountaineers and nature lovers alike.

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The eruption was officially announced a week ago. It is the longest recorded in Iceland – the land of volcanoes, glaciers and geysers – to date.

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