U.S. Senate and House of Representatives agree to destroy chemical weapons in Kentucky, Colorado

The U.S. Senate and House of Representatives recently voted to destroy chemical weapons stored at the Blue Grass Army Depot in Kentucky and in Pueblo, Colo.

Co-chair of the Chemical Demilitarization Citizen's Advisory Board Craig Williams made the announcement on Wednesday at the quarterly meeting of the group, the Richmond Register reports.

The project at both sites will cost approximately $596 million and achieve demilitarization by neutralization. Both chambers of Congress agreed on the price tag for the destruction of the chemical weapons, but they may not see eye to eye on the larger measure of which those funds are a part, according to the Richmond Register.

Both pieces of legislation contained language identical to that included in the Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternative (ACWA) program, and Williams expressed optimism that the full funding will be approved.

Jeff Brubaker, the ACWA project manager at the Blue Grass Army Depot, also announced that the construction of a multi-billion dollar automated chemical weapons destruction plant is 82 percent complete. Systemization efforts have begun and already reached 18 percent, the Richmond Register reports.

The commander of the depot's chemical activity reported at the meeting that 42 of 44 sample nerve-agent rockets were successfully unpacked from their storage tubes in May and propellant samples from 23 of them will be tested for stability. Those tests are conducted every ten years, according to the Richmond Register.