Chicago university enrolls in first responder technology program

RealView, LLC, a mobile software development company, recently announced that the Chicago-based Roosevelt University is entering five of the school's buildings in RealView's CommandScope technology program to provide critical data to first responders.

RealView's CommandScope technology provides city first responders with instant access to floor plans, site plans, campus maps, utility shut-off locations, fire hydrant locations, individuals requiring special assistance and other important building information. By allowing RealView to electronically pre-plan the buildings, Roosevelt University is making its campus more accessible to first responders, FireEngineering.com reports.

"The implementation of CommandScope is one of the more important enhancements we've made to campus safety at Roosevelt," Maureen Froncek, the director of campus safety at Roosevelt, said, according to FireEngineering.com. "In all, we are digitizing the information of more than 1,672,000 square feet of classroom, laboratory, housing, office, and auditorium space."

One of the five buildings Roosevelt is including in the program is the Auditorium Building and Theatre, which was declared a national historic landmark in 1975. The other buildings are the Auditorium Building, the Gage Building, the Goodman Center and the Wabash Building.

CommandScope technology is sharable, which provides first responders unfamiliar with an emergency site with working knowledge of the building, its hazards and its occupants. Instead of trial and error, first responders are able to act with knowledge, saving time and lives, FireEngineering.com reports.

"First responders continuously answer the call to duty by putting themselves at risk to keep us safe," Stephen Nardi, the president of RealView, said, according to FireEngineering.com. "We designed CommandScope with the mindset that this is an advantage first responders need and deserve. We are excited to see this technology embraced by Roosevelt and expect it to become a staple on other campuses, as well."