Researchers in Missouri developing bioterror sensors

Researchers at the Jordan Valley Innovation Center in Springfield, Missouri  have announced advances in their project to create sensors that can detect anthrax, ricin and E. coli.

"Everyone is very afraid that the next terrorist attack will be a biological weapon or chemical weapons," Ryan Giedd, executive director of Jordan Valley Innovation Center, told OzarksFirst.com.

The project, currently in its fifth year,has cost the Army only about $500,000 since its inception. The sensors consist of small round wafers that each hold more than 100,000 sensors and are able to detect a number of different biological threats.

"Everyone is very afraid that the next terrorist attack will be a biological weapon or chemical weapons," Giedd said.

The ultimate goal for the sensors, which must be kept free of dust and outside particles at all times, is to be put into roving robots that are only the size of a kitchen table.

The planned roving robot, scientists say, is still two years away.

"Here at home, it may not be a roving robot it may be something that is more like a smoke detector," Rishi Patel, a scientists at Jordan Valley Innovation Center, told OzarksFirst.com. "It will be satisfying that you have contributed to society in some way."